• Katie

Inside the Rhine

The Rhine River is one of the most famous rivers globally, and for good reason. The Rhine river starts in the Swiss Alps and travels through six countries before it opens out into the North Sea. Flowing through Switzerland, Liechtenstein, Austria, Germany, France, and The Netherlands, the river flows for 765 miles (1230 kilometers), making it one of the longest rivers in Europe. The Rhine gets its name from the Celtic word Renos which means "Raging Flood." In the Swiss town of Schaffhausen, you'll find that the Rhine river plunges 75 feet and is known as the Rheinfall. However, after passing through Schaffhausen, it flows through Basel, and it's here where the river gets calmer and is actually navigable. So why should you take a cruise along the Rhine? Let me tell you why and what you can expect if you do!


What makes the Rhine special?


A cruise along the Rhine passes through six countries and is packed with shoreside activities.


Cycle through the beautiful city of Amsterdam and take some time to visit one of the 50 museums on offer in the city.


Basel is one of the best places to eat. Since it's situated on the border of France and Germany, a wide array of European food is available in Basel.


You'll even get to visit the quaint city of Strasbourg, take a walk along its cobbled streets, and explore many beautiful medieval buildings.


"Rüdesheim am Rhein" has got you covered during Christmas; visit this charming town in Germany during the holidays and you won't be disappointed. The town lights up during Christmas. You also get to indulge in some Rüdesheimer coffee — a mix of whipped cream, sugar, and local Asbach brandy.


Types of Rhine cruises


If you're already sold on the idea of visiting the Rhine but don't know what you want to do, I've got you covered. There are plenty of options for cruises when you choose to visit the Rhine.



Short Cruises:

You've got short cruises that'll last you three to five days, and it'll take you to several places rather than just one. However, your time at those places will be limited.


Long Cruises:

You can also opt for longer cruises that last for seven to eight days. These cruises usually start in Amsterdam and take you all the way to Basel (or the reverse). On your way, you should get to visit the likes of Cologne, Rüdesheim, Koblenz, Mannheim, and Strasbourg. These cruises tend to travel beyond the Rhine, exploring the Moselle and the Main Rivers in Germany.



Even Longer Cruises:

If you have the time to spare (if you do, it's worth it!), you could think about taking a more extended cruise that can span from fourteen days to twenty-two days. You will get to visit plenty more stops along the way — the likes of Budapest in Hungary and Vienna in Austria, and sometimes even Romania- while only unpacking once.


You also benefit from traveling along other rivers such as the Main River and the Danube by taking a more extended cruise. In fact, longer cruises are an especially great idea if you can work remotely- take a longer vacation with less vacation time off!


Christmas Cruises:

Most popular during November and December are short Christmas cruises that'll take you to the likes of Rüdesheim and Cologne, where your Christmas celebrations are all the more special. Cities such as Nuremberg in Germany are famous for their Christmas markets, where you can sip cocoa or Glühwein and get all your holiday shopping done!


The best times to cruise along the Rhine are April to June; the Easter festivities are a great bonus. The weather during these times is great as well. September and October are also great times to visit; you get to enjoy the beautiful fall weather in Europe as well as the pleasant temperature. And if the winter market and Christmas festivals piqued your interest, then make sure you book your cruise for November and December since these cruises are exclusive to these months. Now the only thing left for you to do is pick a month and contact me when you want to book your next cruise. I promise it's an experience you can't miss!





0 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All